Nothing's Shocking

Nothing's Shocking

Released in 1988, Jane's Addiction's Nothing's Shocking lit up cassette decks and CD players across the world with a funky blend of genres and a blatant disregard for classification. The band, who Rolling Stone magazine called "the true heir to Led Zeppelin," burned into American culture with "music that's simultaneously forbidding and weighty, delicate and ethereal."

Unlike the more single-oriented "Ritual de lo Habitual" album that provided hits for radio and MTV, "Nothing's Shocking" was a CD that was usually experienced intentionally. Fans didn't put it on for one song, they put it on to listen to the album end-to-end and experience a psychedlic rock journey. They played the album on long car rides to/from school, at after-hours parties, and when just hanging with friends.

The album takes listeners "Up the Beach" to be "Ocean Size," then for a shower and a psychedelic visit with serial killer Mr. Bundy with "Ted, Just Admit It," to the most epic "Mountain Song" and "Jane Says," finally ending with the defiant "Pigs in Zen." 

The album was ranked #312 on Rolling Stone's "500 Greatest Albums of All-Time." Nothing's Shocking is also included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die. The single "Jane Says" reached number six on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks in 1988. Despite selling only 250,000 copies in its first year, Nothing's Shocking went on to be certified Platinum by the RIAA.